15 February 2018

The Global Grid Twitter Chat: City Branding and Place Making

If you are interested in learning more about City Branding and Place Making



#join The Global Grid Twitter Chat using the # - #TheGlobalGrid
Wednesday, 21st February @ 9pm (Zürich time)

Who will be involved:

The Institute of Place Management (IPM), with Louise Platt (Research Fellow at IPM) leading the conversation, and panel members:
·         
      Malcolm Allan (PlaceMatters);
·         Eduardo Oliveira (Postdoc at WSL-Zürich);
·         Thorsten Kausch (Thorsten Kausch – Cities. Brands. Impulses)
·         The Global Grid team

We will be discussing:

·         The most successful city brands around the world;

·         City brands and diversity;

·         City brand development processes;

·         The pre-requisites of a successful city branding process;

·         A framework for place making projects that bypasses community participation;


·         The influence of city branding processes on urban policies.

29 Ways to Stay Creative

With thanks to Professor Vasco Eiriz, EEG, Uni. Minho, Portugal

http://www.eiriz.org/p/placar.html


2 February 2018

100 Best Things to Do in Australia via Your RV Lifestyle


100 Best Things to Do in Australia

All credits and authorship:

Janice Roger, janice@your-rv-lifestyle.email 
https://www.your-rv-lifestyle.com/things-to-do-in-australia.html
Australia has a wide variety of landscapes, ranging from mountain ranges in the south-eastern and western sections, tropical rainforests in the north-east quarter, with arid and semi-arid desert in the middle. It is the sixth largest nation in the world. The capital city is Canberra.

The country has an extremely diverse way of life and is equally famous for the beautiful beaches, as it is for the rugged outback. Most visitors simply do not realise just how vast the country is!
Each state has different things to offer the tourist. Victoria is widely recognised as the cultural capital, and it is here that you will find the best food and wine. Queensland is mostly tropical, while New South Wales has magnificent beaches. Tasmania is cooler, while the western and northern territories are rugged. Capital Territory prides itself on culture, with many galleries and museums to explore.

1. The Great Barrier Reef

This is located off the coast of Queensland, and is the largest coral reef in the world. It is a huge tourist destination, with cruises and diving boats which offer special expeditions to the reef.
Diving gear is normally available to hire, when you have produced diving documentation, so be sure to take it all with you.
Make sure you book any tours in advance as they are a very popular way to see the reef.

2. Sydney Harbour Bridge

You may also hear of the bridge as ‘the Coathanger’ because of the arch shape. The bridge spans the harbour and carries vehicles, trains, bicycles and foot passengers between the central business district and the North Shore.
The bridge is an iconic feature of the harbour, it was built in 1932 and is the sixth longest spanning bridge in the world. It also ranks as the tallest arch bridge, being 44-feet from the water level to the top.
Plan on spending a day in the area, and make sure you have your camera with you.

3. Uluru

You may have also heard of this as Ayers Rock, which is the more well-known name. It is a huge sandstone rock which can be found in the Northern Territory, 335 km west of Alice Springs.
The rock is sacred to the aboriginal people of the area. The Anangu people often lead walking tours of the rock and surrounding area, and are very informative about the fauna and flora there.
If possible, try to visit at dawn or sunset when the colours are at their most spectacular.
Allow a half day or more, depending on how much exploring you want to do.

4. Sydney Opera House

This ranks as one of the most distinctive and famous of buildings to have been built in the 20th century. It was opened in 1973.
The complex covers the entire Bennelong Point on the harbour, you simply cannot miss it!
There are different venues in the complex, with over 1,500 shows each year. There are three resident companies there, namely Opera Sydney, Sydney Theatre Company, and Sydney Symphony Orchestra.
If you plan to see any show here, you must book in advance. Should you want to stay the night, you will find plenty of hotels in the area.

5. Port Jackson

This is an area, rather than a specific thing. It is where the waters of Sydney Harbour, Middle Harbour, North Harbour, Parramatta River, and Lan Cove all meet. Significantly, it is the spot where the first European settlement in the country took place.
You will remember some events which take place there, namely the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.
The harbour is also famous for the New Year’s Eve firework display.
Spend a full day looking around the area, there are many places where you can get lunch during the day.
Continue reading

30 January 2018

Special Issue of Communication & Society: Place Branding. A Communication Perspective

The journal Communication & Society announces the publication of a Special Issue in October 2018 focused on “Place Branding. A Communication Perspective” guest-edited by 

Nigel Morgan (University of Swansea)

Mihalis Kavaratzis (University of Leicester) 

José Fernández-Cavia (Universitat Pompeu Fabra). 

Although Place Branding is no longer an emerging field of study, it not yet established as a mature discipline. The valuable work of a number of scholars in recent years has advanced the theoretical background of the discipline. Furthermore, the application of branding strategies to a variety of places has greatly contributed to the popularization and professionalization of the field, something also verified by the founding of the International Place Branding Association.

One of the prevailing qualities of place branding is that it critically affects people’s lives as residents and citizens. At the same time, one of its most problematic features is that the image and reputation of places depend heavily on factors that are complex and often impossible to control. Another fascinating characteristic of place branding is its interdisciplinary nature. In the study of place branding, theoretical underpinnings from many disciplines like economics, urban planning, geography, sociology, tourism, marketing, politics and so forth have all played an important role. This is, of course, particularly the case for the discipline of communication, whose links to place branding are indeed very strong. In a sense, it could be argued that branding is, in essence, a form of communication.

This is why this special issue on place branding in a communication journal becomes timely and relevant. In this special issue, we encourage researchers to submit both conceptual and empirical contributions dealing with place branding from a communication perspective. Themes appropriate for this issue include but are not limited to: the contribution of communications to place branding; the use of social media in the promotion of cities, regions and nations; conceptual links between place branding and tourism or public diplomacy; the role of media practitioners in place branding; organizational challenges of public and private place branding institutions; comparative case studies with a particular focus on towns, regions or countries; methods to convey effective place images; and stakeholder engagement in place branding and communications processes. All submitted full papers will undertake a formal process of double-blind peer review by the Communication & Society editorial board.

Submission date: Full papers must be submitted by February 28th, 2018. Contact: For queries, comments and submission, please email jose.fernandez@upf.edu

Authors’ guidelines: http://www.unav.es/fcom/communication-society/en/envio_de_trabajos.php

10 January 2018

Call for Papers: RGS-IBG 2018 Annual International conference, Cardiff (UK), 28.31 August 2018

Call for Papers: RGS-IBG 2018 Annual International conference, Cardiff (UK), 28.31 August 2018

Cross-border areas, macro-regions: rethinking the EU spatiality? 

Session sponsored by the Political Geography Research Group

Conveyors: Estelle Evrard (University of Luxembourg) and Franziska Sielker (University of Cambridge) 

Over the last few years, scholars have attempted to capture EU spatiality. The concept of territoriality was coined as a useful tool to examine the spatial significance of the EU as a political system transcending nation states (Moisio & Lukkonnen, 2014). The different accession phases (“widening”) and integration phases (“deepening”, e.g. Euro currency, Schengen Area) have been analysed as “differenciated integration” (Schimmelfenning, 2016). Over the last two decades, national political parties and public opinion have played a larger role in the integration process. This progressive shift towards the EU integration was described as a move from a “permissive consensus” to a “constraining dissensus” (Hooghe and Marks, 2008). “Disintegration” is part of the political science literature since about a decade (Bartolini, 2004). Brexit represents a direct manifestation of such a shift. The later geopolitical change influences how other member states position themselves within the EU and their respective neighborhood. 
This session suggests taking territorial cooperation within the EU and with its periphery as the entry point to interrogate how EU spatiality is constructed. In this endeavor, cross-border cooperation areas and macro-regions are considered as examples of laboratories of cooperation across national and regional boundaries. These are horizontally at the crossroads of transnational flows and interdependencies fostered by the EU integration process. Vertically, they are often symptomatic to power shifts from the national level to the EU and subnational levels. They therefore allow reflecting on the challenges faced by diverging manifestations of territoriality, in an increasing differentiated integrated EU. 
The RGS conference 2018 takes place while the Commission has released a White paper on the future of Europe suggesting different paths to pursue the EU integration. The overall ambition of this panel is to discuss the plasticity and meaning of EU territoriality against the backdrop of the wide ranging experiences from cross-border and macro-regional cooperation, and bottom-up initiatives without direct relation to EU cooperation formats. In our understanding, these forms of territorial cooperation question the concept of territoriality on the one hand and invite rethinking the EU integration on the other. We understand territoriality as a construction that can play different roles in different cooperation initiatives. We therefore seek both theoretical contributions questioning the core concepts as well as empirical contributions about regional experiences. The session conveyors intend to contribute to the overall reflection of EU spatiality.
The selected research papers will be allocated a slot of 15-minutes.  

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words to Estelle Evrard (estelle.evrard@uni.lu) and Franziska Sielker (fs421@cam.ac.uk) by 2nd February 2018 (5pm). This should include title (max. 15 words), author affiliation and email address.

References
Bartolini, S. (2004): Political territoriality and European (dis)integration: https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/bitstream/handle/1887/13883/IChapter5pdf.pdf?sequence=12 
Hooghe, L., & Marks, G. (2009). A Postfunctionalist Theory of European Integration: From Permissive Consensus to Constraining Dissensus. British Journal of Political Science, 39(1), 1-23. doi:10.1017/S0007123408000409
Moisio, S. & Lukkonnen, J. (2014): European spatial planning as governmentality: an inquiry into rationalities, techniques, and manifestations, Environment and Planning C, 32, p.1-18
Schimmelfenning, F. (2016): Good governance and differentiated integration: Graded membership in the European Union, European Journal of Political Research, 55, p.789-810

8 January 2018

Regional Governance, Industrial Restructuring and Sustainable Development

We are pleased to annouce that registration is open for our forthcoming Global conference in China, this will take place between 29th June - 1st July 2018 at Peking University, Beijing, China. We have 3 confirmed plenary speakers with more names to follow shortly. Please see below for all the relevant information.

Abstract submission deadline: 28th February 2018
Special Session proposal deadline: 14th February 2018


Confirmed plenary speakers (more to follow):Ron Boschma, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
David Rigby, UCLA, USA
Robert Hassink, Kiel University, Germany
Submission Details
Please submit your abstract (250 - 500 word abstracts) through the Regional Studies Association conference portal by 28th February 2017. Please
click here to see the Call for Papers, to read more about the conference please click here.

We welcome papers from all – academics, researchers, students and those working in policy and practice. The event is inclusive and offers networking opportunities for all in our field. The organisers welcome proposals for special sessions, themed workshops and innovative forms of networking and collaboration. If you would like to organise or offer a session to the conference or if you have any questions, please contact Lesa Reynolds: lesa.reynolds@regionalstudies.org


Academic Organiser: Professor Canfei He, Peking University, China


If you would like any further information please do not heistate to contact me.

3 January 2018

Call for papers: Spatial planning & place branding: rethinking synergies and governance

In a special issue for European Planning Studies we intend to bring together experts on spatial planning and place branding to think explicitly on the relation between the two fields and the potential of  theories and practices in which the two are integrated.
We believe exploring the relation between spatial planning and place branding is useful and important because, on the one hand, the relation is still under- explored, while planning could use the insights in place-based value creation stemming from place branding, and place branding often lacks insight in how places might actually be changed or preserved through coordinated intervention. On the other hand, much of the literature on place branding in our view either under- estimates or over- estimates what branding can do, partly because of underlying ideological assumptions, partly because of simply a lack of insight in the functioning of governance, including spatial governance.
Bringing planning and branding closer together in theory and practice means seeing their relation in the context of governance. Planning in this view is spatial governance, the coordination of policies and practices affecting the organization of space. Place branding refers to the creation of value in space by reinforcing and representing the assets of the place in a cohesive manner, in an image and a narrative of the place itself.
Given this context various topics could be explored in this special issue:
  • planning and branding and participatory governance
  • planning and branding and sustainable development
  • planning/branding and the balance preservation/innovation
  • spatial planning as part of place branding
  • place branding as part of spatial planning?
  • planning/branding as core of a development strategy?
  • nature and environmental assets in planning/branding
  • cultural landscapes as meta- assets for planning/branding
  • planning/branding and policy integration
  • innovation and branding
  • design in planning/branding
  • power/knowledge in planning/branding
  • scales in governance/ multi- level governance
  • combining planning/branding for places with deep history
  • agriculture and new food cultures as drivers of planning/branding
  • planning/branding and the balance between collaboration and competition
  • models of branding or planning: caution with best practices
If you are interested in making a contribution to the special issue, please send an abstract of 300-500 words to the guest editors by Feb 15, 2018; for those invited to submit a full paper, please submit this to the guest editors by August 1, 2018; after an internal review and revision, the usual external review for the journal will take place.
Kristof Van Assche, Raoul Beunen and Eduardo Oliveira

https://governancetheory.com/2018/01/03/call-for-papers-spatial-planning-place-branding-rethinking-synergies-and-governance/

18 December 2017

Constructing regional advantage in branding the cross-border Euroregion Galicia–northern Portugal



The cross-border relations between Galicia and northern Portugal have been shifting towards improved competitiveness, but also heading for the creation of stronger cooperation. However, it was only with the EU membership of Spain and Portugal (1986) that the foundation for successful cross-border cooperation was built. 



Constructing regional advantage in branding the cross-border Euroregion Galicia–northern Portugal: (2015). Constructing regional advantage in branding the cross-border Euroregion Galicia–northern Portugal. Regional Studies, Regional Science: Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 341-349.

9 December 2017

Memorial tree was planted at the Martinikerkhof for professor Greg Ashworth

Last Saturday, a memorial tree was planted at the Martinikerkhof for professor Greg Ashworth, who passed away on November 6, 2016. Greg has lived at the Martinikerkhof for decades and was very loved within his neighbourhood. To fund the tree, neigbours have raised 2500 euro to be able to plant a large tree, a copper beech, which has been planted at the corner near the Gardepoort.


6 December 2017

what is the key to success?

10. “The road to success is always under construction.” Lily Tomlin
 
9. “There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.” – Colin Powell
 
8. “Some people dream of success, while other people get up every morning and make it happen.” – Wayne Huizenga
 
7. “Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.” – Winston Churchill

6. “I attribute my success to this – I never gave or took any excuse.” – Florence Nightingale
 
5. “Success is a journey, not a destination. The doing is often more important than the outcome.” – Arthur Ashe
 
4. “Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value.” – Albert Einstein

3. “The secret of our success is that we never, never give up.” – Wilma Mankiller
 
2. “You don't have to be a genius or a visionary or even a college graduate to be successful. You just need a framework and a dream.” – Michael Dell
 
1. “For success, attitude is equally as important as ability.” – Walter Scott

source & credits
Richard Branson
https://www.virgin.com/richard-branson/my-top-10-quotes-success-0

Editorial for virtual special issue: The emergence of new forms of flexible governance arrangements in and for urban regions: an European perspective

These papers greatly highlight the most prominent gaps in the current understanding of flexible modes of governance within the emergence of new territorial settings, with a view to sketching out future research agendas built on the intellectual fissures of current practical and theoretical knowledge. The special issue involves six papers in which three specific knowledge lacunae are visible. The first is the emergence of new kinds of governance spaces dealing with this issue of fuzziness. Second, there is the emergence of a new setting of inter-territorial cooperation as flexible territorial-based governance arrangements. Finally, there is the emergence of new kinds of functionality regarding urban regions based on the labour market and home-to-work travel.



Editorial for virtual special issue: The emergence of new forms of flexible governance arrangements in and for urban regions: an European perspective: (2017). Editorial for virtual special issue: The emergence of new forms of flexible governance arrangements in and for urban regions: an European perspective. Regional Studies, Regional Science: Vol. 4, No. 1, pp. 1-6.

Constructing regional advantage in branding the cross-border Euroregion Galicia–northern Portugal

This paper employs a constructing regional advantage (CRA) approach in respect of examining the potential of joint branding strategies intended to position and give visibility to cross-border regions. The CRA concept is introduced here to improve understanding about the empirical significance of a branding strategy through cross-border relatedness, differentiated knowledge bases and policy platforms. It also aims to contribute to the academic debate on region branding. The case study focuses on the Euroregion composed of Galicia in north-west Spain and northern Portugal (GNP). Findings show that the combination of the key economic domains in which GNP excels will echo the cross-border advantage and strengthen a joint region branding strategy.



Constructing regional advantage in branding the cross-border Euroregion Galicia–northern Portugal: (2015). Constructing regional advantage in branding the cross-border Euroregion Galicia–northern Portugal. Regional Studies, Regional Science: Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 341-349.

4 December 2017

Regional Studies Association - New Regions` Editors


Eduardo Oliveira is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL in Switzerland.  At the WSL he devotes special attention to the effectiveness of territorial governance in strategic spatial planning and implementation as well as on the impacts of strategic spatial planning on urban land change. Eduardo has also been researching to what extent regional branding contributes to landscape conservation and new forms of environmental governance in and for urban regions.

Julie Tian Miao is Lecturer in Urban Planning and Development at the School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Glasgow in the UK. She obtained her PhD from the University College London where she developed her expertise on regional economics and innovation. Her current research interest lies in an innovative junction between the knowledge economy, the high-tech sectors and the housing market. She is the lead author for an edited volume on ‘Making 21st Century Knowledge Complexes: Technopoles of the World 20 years after’ (Routledge, 2015). 


Michael Taster is a postgraduate researcher in the department of Urban Studies and Planning at The University of Sheffield. He is currently undertaking a RSA funded PhD research project, focused on the impact of developments in scholarly communication technologies on learned societies and regional researchers. He is particularly interested in how new technologies and regulation are reshaping academic research practices to be more open and engaged and the implications this has for learned societies that are seeking to re-invent themselves in the face of a new scholarly communications paradigm.
Working together with the Regional Studies Association office team to transform Regions from a printed magazine to a fully online and open access ‘E-Zine’, we can safely say, we are excited about the future of Regions. For the first time in its history, Regionswill fully embrace the knowledge dissemination opportunities of the internet by presenting the latest developments in regional studies to both the membership and the general public. In taking this step, we hope to advance the Regional Studies Association’s mission to be a leading and impactful community, by actively reaching out to new audiences, advancing debates in regional studies and providing the latest evidence based regional knowledge to anyone who seeks it. For this reason, we have been redesigning Regions, in an attractive and dynamic, digital format that will combine empirical and theoretical insights in a way that is rigorous, informative and accessible. At the same time as bringing in new changes, we hope to build on Regions’ legacy of being a critical medium for the communication and sharing of knowledge between members and the wider RSA community. By combining the best of the old with the best of the new, we are certain that the new Regions will prove to be a vital tool to showcase the excellent research carried out by all members of the Regional Studies Association.

Regional Studies Association

23 November 2017

The RSA thanks to the Regions editors

The RSA members will receive the last issue of Regions before the end of this year. This will be the last issue of Regions as the members’ magazine in the print format. In 2018, the magazine moves to a new, more interactive online only format with a new team of editors – Eduardo Oliveira, Julie Tian Miao and Michael Taster.



Regional Studies Association

14 November 2017

Marca Territorial: A visão dos residentes sobre a sua cidade (Cidade da Guarda)

Marca Territorial: A visão dos residentes sobre a sua cidade (Cidade da Guarda) 

por Inês Patrícia Afonso Pais Dissertação para obtenção do grau de Mestre em Gestão Comercial pela Faculdade de Economia do Porto

Orientada por: Pedro Manuel dos Santos Quelhas Taumaturgo de Brito Setembro, 2017

https://repositorio-aberto.up.pt/bitstream/10216/108110/2/223562.pdf

Abstract 

All cities, within a country, try to be leaders through attributes that distinguish them from others. This way, all urban planners and decision-makers that affect the city try to promote their region in order to create a positive and attractive image. Marketing involved in a territorial planning and promotion strategy is a theme very discussed over the time, becoming in one of the answers to the challenges encountered by cities. One of the tools that can bring more value to a place, in a context of territorial marketing, is the use of a territorial brand, to create value in a level of image and positioning, both to an external and internal target. Residents are a segment with a lot of impact when talking about territorial brand, making one of the most important assets within a city. Before we talk about the power of attracting tourists, investors, business, among others, first, we need to evaluate the vision of its population in relation to its image, positioning, satisfaction and identification with the same. The residents of a city are often the mirror of what this city transmits to the outside. In conclusion, the study focuses on this same evaluation. The city in this study is localized in Beira Alta, interior of Portugal, more concretely in City’s Guarda.

Key-Words: Marketing, territorial marketing, territorial brand, residents, City’s Guarda

7 November 2017

Constructing regional advantage in branding the cross-border Euroregion Galicia–northern Portugal

Almost 9000 views



This paper employs a constructing regional advantage (CRA) approach in respect of examining the potential of joint branding strategies intended to position and give visibility to cross-border regions. The CRA concept is introduced here to improve understanding about the empirical significance of a branding strategy through cross-border relatedness, differentiated knowledge bases and policy platforms. It also aims to contribute to the academic debate on region branding. The case study focuses on the Euroregion composed of Galicia in north-west Spain and northern Portugal (GNP). Findings show that the combination of the key economic domains in which GNP excels will echo the cross-border advantage and strengthen a joint region branding strategy.



Constructing regional advantage in branding the cross-border Euroregion Galicia–northern Portugal: (2015). Constructing regional advantage in branding the cross-border Euroregion Galicia–northern Portugal. Regional Studies, Regional Science: Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 341-349. doi: 10.1080/21681376.2015.1044020

MODERNISM, MODERNISATION AND THE RURAL LANDSCAPE

MODERNISM, 
MODERNISATION 
AND THE RURAL LANDSCAPE 

MODSCAPES_conference2018 
10-13 JUNE 2018 (Tartu, Estonia) 

https://modscapes.eu/conference2018/call-for-papers/

23 October 2017

Book review - Local government and urban governance in Europe


 Eduardo Oliveira (2017): Local government and urban governance in Europe, Planning Theory & Practice To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14649357.2017.1385754

This edited volume promises a European-based overview of 60 years of reform in local government policies and the evolution of urban governance practices. The editors organize the book by focusing on three driving forces, which explain in part these wide-ranging and dynamic changes over time: (1) the transition to democracy in the mid-1970s and early 1990s, (2) the 2008 financial and economic crisis, and (3) the implementation of European Union (EU) urban policies.

12 October 2017

Creating the Rotterdam of Tomorrow | Rinske Brand | TEDxRotterdam

Interview with Eduardo Oliveira on Place Branding and Strategic Spatial Planning


Interview with Eduardo Oliveira on Place Branding and Strategic Spatial Planning

Eduardo Oliveira in this interview shares his experience of using place branding as a complementary instrument in strategic spatial planning. He also discusses the digital challenges of city and regional branding and the increasing role of social media in managing place reputation.  

Learn about:

  • Place branding as an instrument of strategic spatial planning;
  • What a valuable place brand is;
  • How local governance influences place branding;
  • Destination marketing through social media: including travellers as co-creators and opinion-makers;
  • Storytelling as a tool for place branding and examples of best practice;
  • How place branding contributes to sustainable regional development.
Read More
http://placebrandobserver.com/interview-eduardo-oliveira/

Reposted: "The planning of tourism on rural areas: the stakeholders` perceptions of the Boticas municipality (Northeastern Portugal)"

All credits:
https://planeamentoterritorial.blogspot.ch/2017/10/the-planning-of-tourism-on-rural-areas.html

"The planning of tourism on rural areas: the stakeholders` perceptions of the Boticas municipality (Northeastern Portugal)"


Abstract
Most of the strategies developed to “save” rural territories in Europe have not been successful. One of the main problems has been the adoption of the top-down paradigm in the approach to the development of those territories. Portugal is a good example of the difficulty of adopting a bottom-up paradigm. The main objective of this paper is to present the perceptions of the local (including the residents) and regional stakeholders acting at Boticas towards the set of resources available and the development of the tourism industry. Boticas is a Northeastern Portuguese rural low density municipality. Capturing those perceptions, the research aims contributing to the establishment of a more integrated and innovative development strategy and, this way, a more able one in what concerns profiting from the potential associated to the growing of the tourism industry experienced lately by Portugal. The adoption of a mixed-method to proceed to the evaluation of the resources and capturing the perceptions on their tourist potential kept by the different stakeholders is suggested. Empirical data was collected through a survey applied to 373 of its residents and 25 interviews conducted to local and regional actors, supported by an inventory performed of the cultural resources and its capacity of being visited. We could conclude that residents tend to have a very positive perception towards tourism development and that their perceptions largely met the ones of other stakeholders.

Keywords: Rural Development; Tourism Planning; Perceptions; Resources; Tourist Attributes; Stakeholders.


Resumo de artigo publicado em European Countryside, Vol.9, Nº 3, 2017, págs. 504-525 [DOI: 10.1515/euco-2017-0030] (trabalho em co-autoria com Paula Remoaldo, Isabel Freitas, Olga Matos, Hélder Lopes, Maria Dolores Sánchez Fernández e Vitor Ribeiro).